Tanzania National Business Council

DIALOGUE

THE COUNCIL

The institutional structure of TNBC is made up of 40 members, 20 being selected private sector representatives and 20 being public sector representatives appointed by the President of the United Republic of Tanzania. The Council, chaired by the President, is supported by an Executive Committee, Working Committees with their Working Groups and Secretariat.  The private sector representatives find their way to the Council through the Tanzania Private Sector Foundation (TPSF), the focal organization of business associations in Tanzania.

Currently Seven Meetings have been held under the Chairmanship of H.E. President of United Republic of Tanzania.

INVESTORS ROUND TABLE

The Investors’ Round Table, a forum of leading international business/ CEOs, local businessmen and Government officials under the chairmanship of the President of the United Republic of Tanzania was established to advise the Government on reforms and initiatives to promote a better investment climate for inward investment.

The Investors’ Round Table (IRT) is the first Working Committee.  Currently Seven International Investors’ Round Table and Three Local Investors’ Round Table Meetings have been held under the Chairmanship of H.E. President of United Republic of Tanzania.

Local Investors’ Round Table (LIRT)

 Forum for dialogue between leading local investors and Government officials.

  • Membership (around 60 – 100) investors drawn from all over the country.
  • Meeting chaired by HE President of the United Republic of Tanzania.
  • Identify progress of investment implementation and recommend strategies for fast tracking the implementation.
  • Recommended the holding of sectoral investment forums such as Tourism Investment Forum leading to privatization of Kilimanjaro Hotel.

 International Investors’ Round Table (IIRT)

  • Forum of leading international businessmen/CEO (around 30 – 40) and blending with local businessmen not less than 12 to catalyze the exchange of ideas.
  • Chaired by HE President of the United Republic of Tanzania.
  • Objective to promote better investment climate for local and foreign direct investment.
  • Underscoring the need to adopt international best practices in the conduct of business.
  • Recommend formation of IRT Working Group to carry forward the reform process and ideas discussed at meeting to improve business environment. Working Groups include: Manufacturing and Agribusiness Agriculture, Tourism and Branding Tanzania, Technology and Human Capital Development and Finance.

REGIONAL BUSINESS COUNCILS

When launching Regional Business Council (RBCs) during the 3rd TNBC Meeting held on 15th March 2005, the main objective was to strengthen the consultative process nation wide so as to spread the benefits of structured dialogue to the majority of Tanzanians.  RBCs are structured such that there is equal representation of regional leadership of the private and public sector.

Main Functions: 

  • Enhance an enabling environment for investment in region.
  • Prepare regional Investors’ Round Map by identifying the existing investment opportunities and impediments to investments.
  • Assist local and foreign investors in liaising with the Government and other respective institutions.
  • Assist indigenous entrepreneurs to develop links with external investors in business undertakings in Region.
  • Act as a service centre to investors by collecting and disseminating information on investment opportunities in the Region.
  • Oversee monitoring and evaluation functions in the Region.
  • Organizing Investors’/Business meetings to speed up resolutions of the various investment impediments.
  • Work closely with TNBC in implementing SMART Partnership Dialogue and other programs.

STRUCTURE OF REGIONAL BUSINESS COUNCIL

Chairman

  • Regional Commissioner will be the Chairman of Regional Business Council and Regional Working Committee.

The Council

  • Proposed to consist of 40 members.
  • 20 from public sector: RAS, DCs, DEOs, Regional and District planning officers, academia and other senior Government Officials.
  • 20 from private sector: TCCIA, Representative of business associations and labour.
  • The Regional Business Councils to meet at lease twice per year.

Executive Committee

  • Chaired by Regional Administrative Secretary.
  • Co- Chaired by the Regional TCCIA Chairman.
  • 4 Members from the public sector preferably DEOs
  • 4 Members from the private sector drawn from TCCIA and must be Members of the Council.

Secretariat

  • Private Sector should serve as Secretariat
  • To service all the meetings of RBC and its Working Committee.
  • To carry out the decisions of RBC.
  • To monitor the implementations of decisions of RBC.
  • To provide a link with TNBC Secretariat.

Working Committees

Investors’ Round Table

  • Investors are Members.
  • Others (Government, NGOs etc) are Observers.
  • To meet once in 6 months.

Regional Smart Partnership Dialogue

  • District level dialogues chaired by DC.
  • Regional level dialogue chaired by RC.
  • Composition: Public Sector, Private Sector including Labour, NGOs, Youth and Media.
  • Dialogue around a given theme.

Working Groups

  • Composed of Government officials, private sector and independent experts.
  • To link with TNBC Working Groups but each region can create own groups. 

List of Mainland Tanzania Regional Business Councils: 

Arusha, Coast, Dar es Salaam, Dodoma, Geita Iringa, Kagera, Katavi Kigoma, Kilimanjaro, Lindi, Manyara, Mara, Mbeya,Morogoro, Mtwara, Mwanza, Njombe Rukwa, Ruvuma, Shinyanga, Simiyu Singida, Tabora and Tanga.

 

DISTRICT BUSINESS COUNCIL 

District Business Council (DBCs) launched by HE Dr. Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete, President of United Republic of Tanzania as part of the TNBC organs during the 5th TNBC Meeting held on 4th December 2008 at Kunduchi Beach Hotel & Resort in Dar es Salaam.  The first point of contact between the private and public sector is at District level making it necessary to open a window of consultation for business environment at district level.

As we move from raising issues to implementation, monitoring and evaluation at local level becomes even more important hence the crucial role of District Business Council(DBCs).

 

DBC STRUCTURE

Chairman

  • District Commissioner will be the Chairman of District Business Council and District Working Committee.

The Council

  • Proposed to consist of 40 members.
  • 20 from public sector: DED, DEO, District planning officers, academia and other senior Government Officials.
  • 20 from private sector: TCCIA, Representative of business associations and labour.

Executive Committee

  • Chaired by DistrictExecutive Director
  • Co- Chaired by the District TCCIA Chairman.
  • 4 Members from the public sector preferably DEO
  • 4 Members from the private sector from TCCIA and otherAssociations who Members of the Council.

Secretariat

  • Private Sector should serve as Secretariat together with District Trade Officer
  • To service all the meetings of DBC and its Working Committee.
  • To carry out the decisions of DBC.
  • To monitor the implementations of decisions of DBC.
  • To provide a link with TNBC Secretariat.

Working Committees

Investors’ Round Table

  • Investors are Members.
  • Others (Government, NGOs etc) are Observers.

District Smart Partnership Dialogue

  • District level dialogues chaired by DC.
  • Composition: Public Sector, Private Sector including Labour, NGOs, Youth and Media.
  • Dialogue around a given theme.

Working Groups

  • Composed of Government officials, private sector and independent experts.
  • To link with TNBC Working Groups but each region can create own groups as per the demand.

SMART PARTNERSHIP DIALOGUE – SPD

Background to the Smart Partnership Dialogue

The Smart Partnership Dialogue (SPD) series promote the principles and practice of the ‘Smart Partnership’ approach to create cooperation between Government and other sectors which contribute to enhancement of social and economic activities. ‘Smart Partnership’ is an innovative concept that is based on positive ethos of ‘prosper thy neighbour’ for ‘win-win’ situation.

 The Smart Partnership Dialogue was first introduced in Langkawi, Malaysia in 1995. Since its formation it has given a drive to the promotion of smart partnership relationships among Governments and the diverse private sector through the creation of national, regional and international hubs within the Commonwealth countries and beyond. The Smart Partnership International Dialogues are held alternately between Malaysia and countries in Southern Africa and are jointly organized by the Commonwealth Partnership for Technology Management (CPTM) and the Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology (MIGHT).

The Dialogue explores smart partnership in its various forms and provides the platform for close interaction between the Heads of State/Government, captains of industry, labour leaders, social groups, civil servants, professionals from the media and academia, youths and other interest groups, to harmonize various issues of socio-economic development and the role of technology in business development.

Smart Partnership Dialogue Movement

Tanzania is a member of the Smart Partnership Dialogue Movement which comprises of Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Malawi, Namibia, Uganda, Barbados and Malaysia the originator. As a member of the movement, Tanzania has to abide to the rules of the game which demand that the Dialogues are held annually at all levels of the society. They are not a one-time event like conferences or symposia; they are a continuous process of making things happen and accounted for.

Rationale of Smart Partnership Dialogue

The National Smart Partnership Dialogue will complement the implementation of the Tanzania Development Vision 2025. In spite of the various initiatives in place, the implementation of Vision 2025 does not seem to be on a projected course for realization of intended objectives of making the country,“graduating from a least developing country to a middle income country with a high level of human development characterized in improvements in the quality of livelihood of the people”.

In this context SPD amplifies the following characteristics which are important for attaining vision goals and targets:

  1. Exchanging ideas that promote understanding and partnerships that lead to successful implementation of the Vision
  2. Increased understanding and consensus on development issues for buy in and ownership.
  3. Awareness creation on the application of Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) for improving productivity and competitiveness for trade within the country and across borders.
  4. Developmental mind set imbued with confidence, commitment and empowering culture values
  5. Good governance , transparency, accountability and rule of law

It should be underscored that the preparation of the National Smart Partnership dialogue is participatory and reflects the joint architect work of the citizens who want to see the future of Tanzania prosperous and real. In this respect the organization of Smart Partnership Dialogue in Tanzania will enliven the dialogue on MKUKUTA (National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty in Tanzania – NSGRP) and The Tanzania Five Year Development Plan 2011/12-2015/2016 as instruments in the implementation of Vision 2025.

The Objectives of the Dialogue

The Main Objective

Smart Partnership Dialogue is a relatively new consultation concept in the Tanzania planning process. The main objective of Smart Partnership Dialogue is to enhance Government’s engagement with all sectors of the society in enhancing information, knowledge and expertise in finding solutions to sustainable development challenges.

The Specific Objectives

The specific objectives of the National Smart Partnership Dialogue are:

  1. To identify appropriate, environmentally sound technologies for increasing efficiency and productivity for sustainable development.
  2. To promote the sharing of innovative ideas that provide solutions to challenges of socio-economic transformation
  3. To identify areas of the economy where technology and innovation can have major impact in enhancing business, trade and socio-economic transformation
  4. To have the nation contribute to socio-economic transformation through the culture of dialogue, tolerance and respect of diverse views.

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